Don’t ferry quagga mussels

Quagga Mussels

Always remember to drain, clean and dry your boat

Memorial Day weekend for many in Arizona means heading to a lake for a day out on the boat. Prep work involved? Snacks, sunscreen and taking along good company.

There’s one more thing you may not be aware of but need to keep in mind. Quagga mussels, a highly invasive species, can spread from one place to another on boats, and thus damage not only watercrafts by ruining motors, but also hurt lake ecosystems and water systems. They are now reported to have spread in Canyon, Apache and Saguaro lakes.

Quagga mussels do this by clinging to hard surfaces such as concrete and pipes, and can affect municipal water treatment plants as well as canals, dams and power plants, which could mean significantly increased maintenance costs.

They also feed on small organisms called plankton, which means less food for native fish, thereby hurting the natural ecosystem.

So, here are some things to always keep in mind:

Before launching into the water:

Either

  • Thoroughly dry the boat, engine, trailer, livewell and bilge spaces

    or:

Power-wash the hull of the boat and its trailer

and

  • Flush bilge spaces with 140-degree water or household vinegar

Quagga Mussel Display
How quagga mussels stick on a pipe

Before leaving the water:

  • Drain the water from the boat, live-bait well and the lower unit
  • Clean and remove all plant and animal material from the hull and trailer
  • Dry the boat and inspect all exposed surfaces

For more information, visit the Arizona Game and Fish Department’s website.

 

 

SRPconnect

SRPconnect

SRP delivers high-value electricity and water for the benefit of our customers, shareholders and the communities we serve. We are a community-based nonprofit utility and the largest provider of electricity in the Greater Phoenix metropolitan area, serving more than 1 million customers. We also are the largest provider of water to the greater Phoenix metropolitan area, delivering about 800,000 acre-feet annually to agricultural, urban and municipal water users.

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