Safe graduation celebrations

Mylar balloons can cause power outages

The one thing you see a lot around graduation season? Glossy Mylar balloons – a popular and festive way to celebrate new graduates! What few people realize, though, is that if revelers don’t securely hold or tether the shiny bouquets, they can leave people in the dark.

Each year, flyaway Mylar balloons cause up to 80 power outages in SRP’s service territory, which can impact tens of thousands of customers. They can also cause fires, damage property or people can be injured.

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Holiday lighting lucky escape

SRP employee shares cautionary tale of lighting safety

Sharing this rather scary experience of an SRP employee and customer, who came home to his “Christmas miracle” over the holiday weekend.

Like many of us, Michael McNamara, a photographer here at SRP, had left his holidays lights plugged in before leaving the house, so they’d be on when he and his family returned home. But when they did, the house was all dark.

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Holiday lighting, decorations safety

Tips to enjoy the holiday season safely

How many hours did you spend unraveling the holiday lights from storage? Now that your house is probably looking all festive with that sweat equity, hope you also took a few minutes to make sure all those lights, inflatables and holiday laser light projectors are installed safely this holiday season.

Each year, fire departments across the country respond to hundreds of home structure fires that begin with Christmas trees or holiday lights, according to the National Fire Protection Association.

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Safety hero

Valley resident credits SRP employee with saving his life

Flynt Smith was on his way to his parent’s house, looking forward to spending a relaxing Memorial Day weekend with his wife and eight children.

Just as Smith, a senior engineer at Coronado Generating Station near St. Johns, Arizona, steered the family van out of the Salt River Canyon toward Globe, he came upon an accident —  an overturned tractor-trailer gasoline tanker.

Smoke poured out from the back of the truck. Gasoline flowed down the side of the road. It sounded like a heavy downpour, Smith recalled. One spark could have ignited the vehicle and the surrounding area.

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